Eco-Living: Bee Bee Wraps

Plastic cling-film is a commonly used method of wrapping food.

Not only is it a form of single-use plastic that is harming our oceans, but it is also thought to negatively impact upon human health.

Now, I know what you’re thinking, “but cling-film is so convenient, what can we use instead?”


As an environmentally aware student I asked myself the same question, but a quick Google search later revealed remarkable alternatives and it was from that moment on that I was introduced to the revelation of Bee Bee Wraps.

Bee Bee Wraps 4I’ve wanted to try Bee Bee Wraps ever since that initial Google search.

They seem like such an ingenious alternative to plastic cling-film and removing as much plastic from my life as possible is a top priority of mine.

Luckily, Kath from Bee Bee Wraps provided me with one of their giant wraps and two of their large wraps to trial for you guys.


“So what exactly are Bee Bee Wraps?”  I hear you ask.

Bee Bee Wraps – as the name suggests – are wraps infused with locally sourced beeswax.

They are a simple to use, reusable and a highly versatile alternative to plastic cling-film.

Even better?

They smell heavenly – honestly, that sweet sweet smell of honey will be one the first things that hits you when you open up the beautifully pristine packaging.


What exactly are Bee Bee Wraps made of then?

“BeeBee beeswax wraps are made from GOTS certified organic cotton printed with low impact dyes, infused with locally sourced beeswax, tree resin and organic jojoba oil. Please avoid if you are allergic to any of these ingredients.” 

All ingredients used to make these sensational pockets of eco-goodness are natural, so after your 12 month usage, they will naturally biodegrade and go back to the earth – just like nature intended!

The designs created by the Bee Bee Wraps team are also fun and stylish, adding that touch of luxury to your kitchen.

Aside from ticking all the ethical and environmental goodness boxes, Bee Bee Wraps are also incredibly easy to use.

As they’re infused with beeswax, these wraps are easily manipulated in the heat of our hands to fit perfectly around any food item or container to create a breathable seal that will leave your food tasting and looking fresh.

As Bee Bee Wraps are breathable, unlike traditional food storage methods like plastic cling-film, food doesn’t ‘sweat’ so lasts for longer.


This week has been a ludicrously busy week for me – moving from place to place – and I really haven’t had time to consider my diet.

Bee Bee Wraps have been an impressive addition to my kitchen kit to solve part of this problem – I’ve noticed such a difference in the freshness of my food and they’ve extended the use-by date for several food items of mine.


Bee Bee Wraps 1The giant wrap (45cm x 55xm) is exactly that – GIANT.

(See my horrendous attempt at showing you just how large they are by using my hand for scale.)

I used this for wrapping my bread and found that the wrap extended its shelf-life by at least 5 days – which as a student is super useful; there’s no way I eat enough bread to consume an average loaf by it’s use-by date.

The large wraps (33cm x 33cm) are £14 for two.

I found that these are best to cover leftovers from dinner and are also a great way to wrap your sandwiches for lunchtime.

If you find these wraps too big to use for your needs, you could potentially cut them to size – there are also other sizes available on the Bee Bee Wraps website.


At first glance these wraps appear to be a tad on the expensive side, but when you consider that they’re reusable and ethically made, I think they’re a bargain.

For me, Bee Bee Wraps are an excellent addition to my kitchen kit as a student.

Overall, not only will you feel better for reducing your plastic consumption and for helping to stop the plastic tide, but they are also a cost-effective and stylish way of storing your food, maintaining its freshness for longer.


Disclaimer: I have not been paid by Bee Bee Wraps for this blog post, but they have provided me with the two reviewed products free-of-charge.


All photographs used in this article belong to Hannah Rudd, please just ask if you’d like to use them 🙂

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